Overview

The interface between innate and adaptive immunity plays an important role for the initiation, perpetuation and resolution of chronic infections and allergic diseases. Accordingly, novel humoral and cellular signaling pathways have been identified in the research program in the context of allergic and infectious disease-related inflammation in vivo in defined disease models and at the molecular level. In the future will also consider environmental factors that can regulate the immune response towards allergens and pathogens through modulation of the microbiome composition. The doctoral researchers will clearly benefit from the broad spectrum of in vitro systems and in vivo models of inflammatory diseases offered by the IRTG and the expertise of the IRTG researchers within the fields of allergy and infection research. To better understand the similarities and the differences of the complex immunological networks underlying allergic and infection-associated inflammation, systems immunology approaches will be implemented that have been developed by our partner university in Cincinnati. With this program the IRTG aims at identifying novel target molecules or signaling pathways in order to come up with innovative therapeutic strategies and at educating immunologists for the domestic and international job market at the interface between allergy and infectious disease research.

The research program is supplemented by a structured qualification and cross-border supervisory concept with defined training modules that integrates student exchanges between the German and the US partner institutions. The qualification concept comprises an IRTG- specific seminar that integrates visiting researchers, jointly held courses, a yearly retreat, an international symposium and individualized educational as well as mentoring programs. General key skills will be imparted through the multiple course offers of the Graduate School Lübeck.

 

Please find here more information on

Research Area A "Environmental changes as culprits of maladaptive immune deviation in allergy"

and

Research Area B "Cellular cross-talk and molecular mechanisms controlling infections with intracellular pathogens"